Monday, February 13, 2006

Serenity, Courage, Wisdom

The story was broken by VirtueOnline -- not the most reputable of news sources, but the only one running the story (and letting anyone who wants comment on it with their cracked views on theology and canon law).

Bishop V. Gene Robinson of New Hampshire has checked himself into an alcohol rehab center.

From the Response Letter of the Standing Committee of the Diocese of New Hampshire:
The Episcopal Church, through its General Convention, has long recognized alcoholism as a treatable human disease, not a failure of character or will.

As someone who's struggled with alcoholisim from both sides of the bottle, my prayers go out to him and his family. I cannot imagine going through this with the world's scruitiny focused down the back of my neck. Prayers also go out to all the clergy, anywhere, any denomination, who are also struggling with this disease.

From the Book of Common Prayer:
O blessed Lord, you ministered to all who came to you: Look with compassion upon all who through addiction have lost their health and freedom. Restore to them the assurance of your unfailing mercy; remove from them the fears that beset them; strengthen them in the work of their recovery; and to those who care for them, give patient understanding and perservering love. Amen.

5 Comments:

At 14 February, 2006, Anonymous Chris T. said...

Thanks for passing on the news--I will keep +Gene in my prayers.

I'll pass on reading the article itself, though--something tells me the comments would just get me angry. :-)

 
At 15 February, 2006, Blogger Pisco Sours said...

We should be getting angry. I'm appalled at how badly "orthodox Christians" will kick at and spit on a man when he's already down. It's sordid and shameful.

 
At 15 February, 2006, Blogger Sister Mary Hasta said...

Anger is good, but yelling matches doesn't do anyone any good. I think just standing up and saying, "Dude, you're wrong" as often as possible without engaging to hurt is the best course.

But then again, I could be wrong.

 
At 15 February, 2006, Blogger Pisco Sours said...

Sorry, SMH. I'm still struggling with the problem of pursuing justice for LGBT people within the church in a firm but loving manner. I apologize if I came off as too strident, but there's a whole history of communal and personal hurt that's hard for me to shake.

 
At 15 February, 2006, Blogger Sister Mary Hasta said...

No worries, Pisco, and we've all got our own stories of How The Church Done Done Me Wrong. Moving beyond that is what is sometimes called 'the faith journey'.

 

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